Posts Tagged ‘trial’

Aung San Suu Kyi Charged With Bribery By Myanmar Military

June 13, 2021

Aung San Suu Kyi has been charged with corruption by Myanmar’s military authorities, the most serious charge against her to date.

Suu Kyi is accused of accepting cash and gold in bribes and faces up to 15 years in prison if convicted.

Six other charges are pending against her, including illegally importing walkie-talkies and inciting public unrest.

In a coup on 1 February 2021, the former state counsellor was arrested.

Since then, she has been held under house arrest and has barely been seen or heard from except for brief court appearances.

According to a press release issued by the military council, Suu Kyi accepted $600,000 (£425,000) in bribes and seven pieces of gold.

Additionally, it alleged that the previous civilian government – the National League for Democracy (NLD) – had lost substantial amounts of money in land deals. As well as Suu Kyi, who spent years under house arrest during previous periods of military rule, several other former officials face similar charges of corruption and bribery.

Previously, Suu Kyi had been charged with breaking the official secrets act, which carries a sentence of up to 14 years in prison.

After the general elections in 2020, Myanmar’s military seized power on allegations of voter fraud.

However, independent election monitors say the election was mostly free and fair, and the charges against Ms Suu Kyi are widely viewed as politically motivated.

Due to her enduring popularity, they will likely be used to disqualify her from running in future elections.

Khin Maung Zaw, her lawyer, said the corruption charges are absurd and that she could face long prison terms if found guilty.

“That’s one of the reasons to charge her,” he said.

Burma’s military has brutally suppressed pro-democracy protesters following the coup.

According to the monitoring group Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (AAPP), security forces have killed more than 800 people and detained nearly 5,000 people to date.

The charges against Aung San Suu Kyi:
Corruption, which carries a maximum jail term of 15 years;
Violation of the official secrets act, which carries a maximum jail term of 14 years
Illegally importing walkie-talkies, which carries a maximum jail term of three years
Importing walkie-talkies, which carries a maximum jail term of one year
Violation of a natural disaster law, which carries a maximum jail term of three years
Inciting public unrest, which carries a maximum jail term of three years

Myanmar Leader Suu Kyi Is Facing More Charges Before Trial On June 14th, 2021

June 12, 2021

Myanmar’s former leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, who led the country until the military took control in a coup in February, is facing more corruption charges just days before a formal trial is set to begin.
According to Global New Light Of Myanmar, the allegations, which come on top of a string of other charges, follow an investigation by the Anti-Corruption Commission into the Daw Khin Kyi Foundation.
According to the paper, she was found guilty of corruption by using her position. “So she was charged under section 55 of the Anti-Corruption Law.”
She is also accused of wrongdoing over a number of land and property leases for her foundation, where she is the chair, as well as accepting $600,000 and gold from the former chief minister of the Yangon region.
According to the paper, several other officials were also found guilty of corruption in granting land use permits.
According to the paper, the police stations in their respective townships opened case files against them recently.
Aung San Suu Kyi and senior members of her government were taken into custody by the military on February 1 after army chief Min Aung Hlaing seized power, plunging the country in a protracted crisis.
The generals’ power grab has sparked months of protests and a mass civil disobedience movement, which has been met with force. According to the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners, which has been monitoring the situation, more than 850 people have been killed in the crackdown.
In addition to carrying unlicensed walkie-talkies, she violated the country’s coronavirus restrictions and breached its colonial-era Official Secrets Act.
On June 14, 2021, Aung Sun Suu Kyi is set to go on trial. Myanmar’s former leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, who led the country until the military took control in a coup in February, is facing more corruption charges just days before a formal trial is set to begin.
According to Global New Light Of Myanmar, the allegations, which come on top of a string of other charges, follow an investigation by the Anti-Corruption Commission into the Daw Khin Kyi Foundation.
According to the paper, she was found guilty of corruption by using her position. “So she was charged under section 55 of the Anti-Corruption Law.”
She is also accused of wrongdoing over a number of land and property leases for her foundation, where she is the chair, as well as accepting $600,000 and gold from the former chief minister of the Yangon region.
According to the paper, several other officials were also found guilty of corruption in granting land use permits.
According to the paper, the police stations in their respective townships opened case files against them recently.
Aung San Suu Kyi and senior members of her government were taken into custody by the military on February 1 after army chief Min Aung Hlaing seized power, plunging the country into a protracted crisis.
The generals’ power grab has sparked months of protests and a mass civil disobedience movement, which has been met with force. According to the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners, which has been monitoring the situation, more than 850 people have been killed in the crackdown.
In addition to carrying unlicensed walkie-talkies, she violated the country’s coronavirus restrictions and breached its colonial-era Official Secrets Act.
On June 14, 2021, Aung Sun Suu Kyi is set to go on trial.

Suu Kyi Makes First Court Appearance After Myanmar Military Coup

May 26, 2021

Aung San Suu Kyi appeared in court in person for the first time since her government was overthrown by the military in February 2021.
In the capital Naypyidaw, the hearing was immediately adjourned. Several charges are pending against the former leader, including violating a state secret law.
Ms Suu Kyi met her lawyers for the first time in person before the hearing.
Since she was deposed, she has been under house arrest for 16 weeks.
Ms Suu Kyi’s party, the National League for Democracy, has been accused of election fraud by the Myanmar military.
Ms Suu Kyi’s charges have been widely attacked as politically motivated by independent election monitors who say the election was mostly free and fair.
Since the February 2021 coup, Myanmar’s military has brutally cracked down on pro-democracy protesters, killing more than 800 people and detaining more than 4,000, according to the monitoring group Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (AAPP).
Among the six charges against Ms Suu Kyi, 75, are illegally importing handheld radios, as well as violating the Corona virus rules. Before the hearing was adjourned on Monday, she was allowed 30 minutes with her attorneys.
Her health was described as good during the meeting in the capital Nay Pyi Taw, but she was not allowed access to the news media during her house arrest and knew little about what was going on in the country.
Lawyers for Suu Kyi said she wished people good health. Her National League for Democracy (NLD) party was also threatened by the military.
According to Khin Maung Zaw, one of her lawyers, the party grew out of the people so it will exist as long as people support it.

Myanmar in profile
Burma, also known as Myanmar, gained its independence from Britain in 1948. Throughout much of its modern history, it has been ruled by the military
In 2010, restrictions began loosening, leading to free elections in 2015 and the installation of Aung San Suu Kyi’s government in 2016.
As a response to Rohingya militant attacks on police, the Myanmar army executed a deadly crackdown, forcing more than half a million Rohingya Muslims across the border into Bangladesh, which the United Nations subsequently described as a textbook example of ethnic cleansing.

The Head of Apple Software Engineering Testifies in Apple V. Epic Games Trial

May 24, 2021

Craig Federighi, Apple’s software engineering head, recently testified in court, explaining the key differences between the iPhone and Mac operating systems.

Third-party software can also be downloaded from the MacOS App Store. However, iOS systems have never allowed third-party downloads.

Epic’s key argument in this trial is that Apple’s behavior can be considered anti-competitive and monopolistic by not allowing third-party app downloads or stores.

Despite the fact that there have always been a greater number of iPhone users than Mac users, Federighi stated that there are still a lot of iPhone users. Considering this, he said the iPhone is likely to suffer more malware attacks.

Macs are less than a tenth as common as iOS devices, so from an attacker’s perspective, iOS is a much more attractive market to attack.

As well, he argued that iPhone users are much more casual than Mac users, and are more likely to download malicious software without realizing it.

Federighi explained that iOS users have just become accustomed to getting apps all the time, quoting Apple’s famous slogan: “There’s an app for that.”

Federighi also discussed the sensitivity of data and the casual nature of iPhone users. Mobile devices are designed to be carried wherever a user goes in addition to carrying the user’s most sensitive information — contacts, photos, documents, bank details, and even their location.

“Iphones are very attractive targets,” he said.

You have them all the time, and they have some of your most personal information — of course, your contact info, your photos, but also other things.”

An attacker can gain access or control of any of these devices for a great deal of money from all of these factors.

Last but not least, Federighi suggested that iPhone and Mac are designed for completely different audiences — the latter being far more technologically literate.

Mac computers are marketed as specialist devices for professionals who understand how to download software safely. However, iPhones are marketed towards those that might not know how to protect themselves from malicious attacks, such as children.

The Mac has been part of this generation of systems where the expectation is you can get software wherever — you can give it to your friend and he’ll run it, that is part of the expectation. But Mac users also expect a degree of flexibility that helps them accomplish their goals. to what they do. Some of them are software developers, some of them are pros running their unique tools, and having that power is part of it,” Federighi said.

It’s as if the Mac is a car — you can drive it anywhere and off-road if you want. It comes with being a driver, you’ve got to be trained, there’s a certain level of responsibility, but that’s what you bought. Your goal was to buy a car.
“With iOS, we were able to create something that kids — heck, even infants — could operate and be safe doing so. That’s a real game-changer.”

Dou you enjoy playing games? You can play with EagleFly at Twitch.TV and Facebook Live.

My email is tomtardis@yahoo.com

An Epic Games v. Apple Court Document Shows How Small Fortnite’s iOS Audience Was

April 29, 2021

A new court document ahead of the Epic v. Apple trial has revealed how small Fortnite’s iOS audience was.
A preview of the trial, which includes excerpts from a deposition with several Epic employees, was shared by The Verge ahead of the trial.
During conversations with Epic’s chief financial officer Joe Babcock, the latter was asked about monthly flash reports that showed Fortnite’s revenue split between platforms.
Babcock confirmed that iOS had the second-lowest revenue of all platforms, only outperforming Android. Fun fact: the game was not initially available on Google Play, but rather through an online installer.
Fortnite was pulled from Google Play in August last year after Epic introduced direct payments that violated Google’s developer agreement.
Further insight was gained from a conversation with senior online and gameplay programmer David Nikdel.
It’s… it’s comparative [sic] small compared to the other consoles in Fortnite in particular, Nikdel said.
Nikdel was presented with a chart, which confirmed the PS4 platform will generate 40% of the game’s revenue in 2020, making it the biggest platform for a battle royale.
Xbox was expected to generate 24% of the revenue, while iOS was only forecast to generate 5.8%.
Nikdel also stated that 44% of those players who used an iOS device already owned another platform through which they could access Fortnite.
The expectation was that anyone who had already played on more than one platform would be able to continue to play on the other platforms.
Since Fortnite’s iOS release came so late in the game’s lifetime, Nikdel believes it was reasonable to assume that these users had already played the game on these platforms prior to its release on iOS.
All this illustrates how Epic Games is able to afford to cut off both mobile platforms in its crusade against 30% commissions and tightly-controlled ecosystems where it’s unable to accept direct payments or introduce its own app store.
However, that’s not to downplay the money Epic has lost through this endeavor. Sensor Tower estimates show Fortnite had generated $1.2 billion between launch on iOS and its removal from the store.
In the preceding month, it had generated $43.4 million, as well as $3.3 million via Google Play.
Epic v. Apple trial begins on Monday, May 3rd, 2021.