Posts Tagged ‘coup’

The Myanmar Military Have Now Officially Killed 1,000 Of Their Own People Since Feb. 1 Coup

August 19, 2021

Since Aung San Suu Kyi was ousted from power six months ago, Myanmar’s security forces have killed more than 1,000 civilians, an advocacy group said on Wednesday.
Since Feb 1, when the armed forces seized power in a lightning coup, protesters demanded the return of democracy, the country has been in turmoil.
Police responded with bloody crackdowns, using live ammunition against civilians. Despite this, anti-junta mobs — some of which have formed self-defense groups — continue to take to the streets daily in flash marches.
A group that verifies deaths and mass arrests under the regime, Assistance Association for Political Prisoners, said 1,001 people were killed by security forces recently, said AAPP’s joint secretary Ko Bo Gyi.
Whenever the military is in power, they will continue to kill youths, professionals such as doctors and teachers, men, women, and children.
They are not only killing our lives, but also destroying our country’s future and democratic hopes.”
Ko Bo Gyi, whose group has been designated an “illegal” organization by the junta and is currently in hiding, also accused authorities of “weaponizing” Covid-19 as the country reels from a deadly surge. Covid has so far caused more than 360,000 cases and 13,623 deaths in Myanmar.
Due to the nationwide strikes against the junta, many hospitals lack medical staff, which has aggravated the health crisis.
The military-run hospitals also have a hard time getting patients in, therefore pharmacies across Yangon are flooded with queues for oxygen and medical supplies.
As a result, the junta repeatedly justified the coup by claiming widespread fraud in last year’s election and citing much lower civilian death tolls.
According to authorities, more than 90 members of the security forces have been killed in clashes since June.
Deposed leader Suu Kyi is facing a raft of criminal charges, from possessing illegal walkie-talkies to violating the state secrets act.
Army chief Min Aung Hlaing was installed as the prime minister of a “caretaker” government, which the junta has dubbed the State Administration Council.

Opposition Are Killing People Who Work For The Myanmar Military

June 24, 2021

Yangon’s Hlaing Township lost an alleged informant recently and at least six young people who posted photos of the crime scene were arrested, residents say.
Kyaw Aye, whose tea shop was reportedly used by members of Ma Ba Tha to gather, was fatally wounded in Ward 13 at close range after being shot in the chest by an unknown gunman. 
According to a resident, he was on his way to the teashop when the attack occurred, and he died on the spot. 
“We heard the sound of gunfire,” she said. “When we went outside there was no one there anymore.”
After the incident, twenty soldiers came to the ward and arrested three women and three men who had taken pictures of the aftermath.
Hla Win, the military-appointed administrator in the ward, went into hiding late last month, leaving the neighborhood without an administrator.
The resident who heard the gunshot described Kyaw Aye as an informant who worked with Hla Win to arrest over 20 anti-coup protesters. 
The killing is the latest in a series of assassinations targeting pro-regime officials across the country. Ward administrators are often targets because they are part of the regime’s surveillance network. 
In Yangon alone, nine administrators have been killed.

Five People Were Arrested in Myanmar For Assassination

June 21, 2021

Five people were arrested in Yangon’s Botahtaung Township recently near the site of the assassination of former Union Solidarity and Development Party (USDP) MP Nay Myo Aung.

Local residents say all five live near Botahtaung Pagoda, where Nay Myo Aung was killed by two men on motorcycles on June 10, 2021.

Win Htay and Hla Htay are said to be employees of the Myanma Port Authority’s civil engineering department. Three others were identified as Soe Thaung, Htein Lin, and Kyaw San Win.

The men’s relatives say they have not heard from them since they were taken into custody.

According to a member of the National League for Democracy (NLD) living in Botataung Township, none of the five detainees are affiliated with the NLD.

In regard to the death of Nay Myo Aung, some USDP members were pointing fingers at the assailants, he said.

Nay Myo Aung was elected to the Yangon Region parliament in 2010 as the representative for Seikkan Township’s constituency 2, but he lost his seat five years later when the NLD took power in Myanmar.

He ran again in 2018 and defeated his NLD rival by around 150 votes. Ultimately, the result was overturned because of alleged electoral fraud, allowing the NLD candidate, who received the second-most votes, to claim the seat.

USDP spokesperson Thein Tun Oo said after his murder that the party was responding according to the law.

USDP members are accused of serving as informants for the regime that seized power on February 1. In the wake of murderous crackdowns on protesters, several party members have been targeted by guerilla groups.

A fatal drive-by shooting in May 2021 resulted in the death of the USDP township chair in Bilin, Mon State, who was walking with his wife to their rambutan plantation when he was shot in the head by two gunmen.

A USDP member and former local administrator in Mohnyin, Kachin State, was assassinated before dawn on June 1, 2021.

UN Finally Reacts To Myanmar Coup And Tries To Pass An Arms Embargo

June 20, 2021

In response to this year’s violent military coup, the UN has called for the suspension of arms sales to Myanmar.

The General Assembly adopted a resolution condemning the military junta that overthrew the elected government in February 2021.

Also, the UN called for the release of political prisoners, such as Aung San Suu Kyi, and an end to violence against peaceful protesters.

Even though the resolution is not legally binding, it has political significance.

As UN special envoy on Myanmar, Christine Schraner Burgener told the General Assembly, “the risk of a large-scale civil war is real.” “Time is of the essence. The opportunity to reverse the military takeover is dwindling.”

Belarus was the only country to vote against it, with 119 countries supporting it.

Another 36 countries abstained, including Russia and China – Myanmar’s two largest arms suppliers.

Abstainers argued the crisis was an internal matter for Myanmar, while others argued the resolution did not address a crackdown on the Rohingya Muslim population four years ago that forced almost a million people to flee their homes.

EU ambassador to the UN, Olof Skoog, said the resolution “delegitimizes the military junta, condemns its abuse and violence against its own people, and demonstrates its isolation from the world.

Myanmar’s military has brutally cracked down on pro-democracy protesters, activists, and journalists since the coup.

According to the monitoring group Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (AAPP), security forces have killed more than 860 people and detained nearly 5,000 to date.

In a statement, Human Rights Watch urged the UN General Assembly to pass a resolution calling for an arms embargo, stating that “while not legally binding on states, such a resolution would have a significant political impact.”

Governments need to recognize that any arms sold to Myanmar’s military will likely be used to commit abuses against the population. “Arms embargoes can help prevent such crimes.

Myanmar in profile
Burma, also known as Myanmar, became independent from Britain in 1948. It’s been under military rule for most of its modern history. In 2009, however, the restrictions began to ease, and in 2015, a new government was installed led by opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi.
The Myanmar army responded to attacks by Rohingya militants in 2017 with a deadly crackdown, driving more than half a million Rohingya Muslims across the border into Bangladesh in what the UN called an “ethnic cleansing textbook example.”
Suu Kyi, 75, has been under house arrest since the coup and hasn’t been seen or heard from much outside of short court appearances.

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A Movement Is Pressuring Governments To Sanction Myanmar Military Oil Company and Myanmar State Banks

June 6, 2021

Electoral parliamentarians and campaign groups are pressing foreign governments to impose sanctions on Myanma Oil and Gas Enterprise (MOGE) and state banks, which are now under junta control.
40 French lawmakers recently called on their government to support EU sanctions against MOGE, calling it a significant financial windfall for the junta.
Parliamentarians also asked for official recognition of the National Unity Government (NUG) and the Committee Representing Pyidaungsu Hluttaw.
Six US senators requested sanctions against MOGE in a letter to US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen and Secretary of State Anthony Blinken in April 2021.
“When the junta was in place previously in the 1990s, gas revenues from Total and Chevron/Unocal helped them withstand international sanctions as their reserves diminished. Specifically, we believe that the Tatmadaw should be prevented from having access to a steady supply of international resources,” the senators wrote,
The Washington Post published an editorial urging action on oil and gas revenue flows to the junta the same month.
By passing sanctions on MOGE, the Biden administration could break the deadlock. These sanctions could allow Total and Chevron to continue gas production while preventing profits from being transferred. The Treasury department might also sanction accounts in Thailand and Singapore where MOGE collects royalties, according to the paper.
In recent weeks, campaign groups have increased their efforts.
Daniel Eriksson, CEO of global anti-corruption organization Transparency International, sent a letter to European Commission Vice-President Josep Borrell Fontelles on May 25 calling for EU action to stop oil and gas revenue flowing to Myanmar’s military government.
Daniel wrote, “The junta will likely use [oil and gas revenues] to control the government apparatus, finance atrocities against the local population, purchase arms, and seize portions for private gain.”
The letter called for sanctions against MOGE, Myanma Foreign Trade Bank and Myanmar Investment and Commercial Bank, the intermediary banks that collect oil and gas revenue.
The campaign for sanctions intensified after TotalEnergies and Chevron announced that dividends from the Yadana pipeline project will not be paid, costing the junta tens of millions of dollars.
408 civil society groups released a statement on Friday demanding that TotalEnergies and Chevron “support targeted sanctions rather than lobbying for exemptions.”
The company’s chairman, Patrick Pouyanné, told its shareholders recently that it would comply with any future sanctions.
The Human Rights Watch responded to TotalEnergies and Chevron’s announcement by stating that a suspension of pipeline profits is not enough without targeted sanctions.
Human Rights Watch’s John Sifton said Chevron and Total’s recent decision is a step in the right direction, but it affects less than 5 percent of the natural gas revenue the Myanmar government receives. “For real impact, governments and companies need to stop the junta from receiving funds or accessing bank accounts that receive payments.”
Human Rights Watch has also expressed concern about the role played by Thai oil company PTT and called on governments that have sanctioned military conglomerates to pressure Japan, Singapore, and Thailand to take similar measures.
As echoed by the Committee Representing Pyidaungsu Hluttaw, Global Witness called for targeted sanctions and oil and gas funds to be kept in a protected account.
“To capture the rest of these revenues, the international community must impose targeted economic sanctions against the military’s economic interests in the oil and gas sector. The proceeds from the sale of Myanmar’s natural gas will be held for a future, the legitimate government rather than funding the military regime,” said Keel Dietz of Global Witness.
A Myanmar budget document drawn up before the coup predicted Myanmar would earn 2,305 billion kyat (about US$1.4 billion) from oil and gas in 2022. Just over 10% of total government revenues will come from the sector this year.

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ASEAN Wants Talks With Myanmar Military To Work Or Myanmar Will Get More Sanctions From The European Union

June 6, 2021

The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) is set to hold talks with Senior General Min Aung Hlaing as Myanmar enters its fifth month of crippling unrest since the military seized power on February 1, amid fears of more European Union sanctions.

Since the coup, Myanmar has been in chaos with its economy paralyzed; more than 800 people have been killed in a brutal crackdown on dissent, according to local monitoring groups.

Brunei’s second minister for foreign affairs Erywan Pehin Yusof and ASEAN Secretary-General Lim Jock Hoi are in the Myanmar capital Naypyidaw, a senior official who declined to be identified told AFP.

The envoys will meet Min Aung Hlaing on Friday morning, the official added, and military representatives told journalists that more information would be released shortly about the meeting.

ASEAN, which includes Myanmar, has led diplomatic efforts to resolve the crisis, but the group operates based on non-interference in each other’s affairs and acts on consensus. The effectiveness of its initiatives has been questioned.

There was no immediate word on whether the envoys would also meet with leaders of the National Unity Government (NUG), which has largely ousted parliament members from Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy.

“ASEAN diplomacy is doomed from the beginning,” Myanmar analyst David Mathieson said.

“This visit will likely lead to the West showing Naypyidaw a clear sign that its coup is working.”

Recently, the NUG announced an amendment to the country’s citizenship laws that would allow for the recognition of Muslim Rohingya as citizens, saying it would “build a prosperous and democratic federal union where all ethnic groups of the Union can live together peacefully.”

In 2017, hundreds of thousands of Rohingya fled the country following a brutal military crackdown that is now being investigated as a possible genocide. Aung San Suu Kyi and her elected government had previously defended the actions, even traveling to the Hague to testify.

Peter Maurer, the president of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), was the most senior leader of an international organization to visit Naypyidaw when he met Min Aung Hlaing.

Maurer said the people of Myanmar need assistance and protection urgently.

In his remarks, he discussed that the use of force during security operations and called for better humanitarian access to conflict areas and the resumption of Red Cross prison visits, according to the statement.

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Myanmar Shadow Government Teams With Rebel Group To FIght Myanmar Military

June 1, 2021

A shadow government in Myanmar seeking to reverse the February 1 2021 coup has joined forces with a rebel group to “demolish” military rule, it said.

Myanmar has been in turmoil since the military overthrew Aung San Suu Kyi and her National League for Democracy government and launched a brutal crackdown on dissent.

A group of deposed lawmakers later set up a shadow “National Unity Government” which has sought to bring anti-coup dissidents together with Myanmar’s myriad ethnic rebel fighters to form a federal army to challenge the military government.

On Saturday, the rebel Chin National Front signed an agreement to “demolish the dictatorship and to implement a federal democratic system” in Myanmar, the NUG said in a statement.

They pledged “mutual recognition” and to “partner equally” the statement added, without giving further details. A CNF spokesperson could not immediately be reached for comment.

The group – which represents the mainly Christian Chin minority in western Myanmar – signed a ceasefire with the country’s military, also known as Tatmadaw, in 2015.

In recent years, its fighters have dwindled.
“The CNF has no real military strength, so this move is symbolic,” Richard Horsey, senior adviser on Myanmar to the International Crisis Group, told the AFP news agency.

“But [it is] nevertheless significant as CNF has been quite prominent in the peace process, due to its well respected political leaders in exile.”

Several of Myanmar’s rebel armed groups have condemned the military coup and the use of violence against unarmed civilians.

Some are also providing shelter and even training to dissidents who flee into their territories.

On Friday, the NUG released a video it said showed the first batch of fighters from its “People’s Defence Force”, formed to protect civilians, completing their training.

The video shows about 100 fighters marching on a muddy parade ground in the jungle. They march in new camouflage uniforms behind the flags of the new force, red with a white star. They are not shown carrying weapons.

“This military is established by the official civilian government,” an unidentified officer says at the ceremony. “The People’s Defence Force must be aligned with the people and protect the people. We will fight to win this battle.”

The military authorities say the NUG is treasonous and designated it and the People’s Defence Force as “terrorist” groups.

Coup leader Senior General Min Aung Hlaing has justified his February 1 power grab by claiming electoral fraud in November elections won by Aung San Suu Kyi’s NLD party. Independent observers dispute the assertions of widespread irregularities.

Myanmar’s security forces have killed more than 800 people since the coup, according to figures cited by the United Nations. More than 4,000 people have been detained.A shadow government seeking to overthrow the February 1, 2021, coup has joined forces with rebels to “demolish” military rule.

Myanmar has been rocked by turmoil since the military overthrew Aung San Suu Kyi and her National League for Democracy government and began a brutal crackdown on dissent.

In response, deposed lawmakers set up a shadow National Unity Government (NUG), which has sought to bring anti-coup dissidents and ethnic rebels together to form a federal army that will challenge the military government.

The NUG stated that the rebel Chin National Front signed an agreement to demolish the dictatorship and implement a federal democratic system in Myanmar.

In a statement, they pledged mutual recognition and to work together equally, without providing any further details. CNF could not be reached for comment immediately.

In 2015, the group – which represents the mainly Christian Chin minority in western Myanmar – signed a ceasefire with the country’s military, also known as Tatmadaw.

Its fighters have dwindled in recent years.
The CNF does not have real military strength, so this move is symbolic, said Richard Horsey, senior adviser on Myanmar at the International Crisis Group.

“But [it is] nevertheless significant as CNF has been quite prominent in the peace process, due to its well respected political leaders in exile.”

Several of Myanmar’s rebel armed groups have condemned the coup and the use of violence against civilians.

Others provide shelter and even training to dissidents who flee into their territories.

The NUG recently released a video in which it said the first batch of fighters from its People’s Defense Force, formed to protect civilians, finished their training.

The video shows about 100 fighters marching in the jungle on a muddy parade ground. Their new camouflage uniforms are displayed behind the red with white star flags of the new force. Weapons are not shown on them.

“This military is established by the civilian government,” an unidentified officer said at the ceremony. “The People’s Defence Force must be aligned with the people and protect them. We will win this battle.”

The military authorities declare the NUG treasonous and have designated it and the People’s Defence Force as terrorist groups.

Coup leader Senior General Min Aung Hlaing has justified his February 1 power grab by claiming electoral fraud in November elections won by Aung San Suu Kyi’s NLD party. Independent observers dispute the assertions of widespread irregularities.

According to figures cited by the United Nations, Myanmar’s security forces have killed over 800 people since the coup. Over 4,000 people have been detained.

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Suu Kyi Makes First Court Appearance After Myanmar Military Coup

May 26, 2021

Aung San Suu Kyi appeared in court in person for the first time since her government was overthrown by the military in February 2021.
In the capital Naypyidaw, the hearing was immediately adjourned. Several charges are pending against the former leader, including violating a state secret law.
Ms Suu Kyi met her lawyers for the first time in person before the hearing.
Since she was deposed, she has been under house arrest for 16 weeks.
Ms Suu Kyi’s party, the National League for Democracy, has been accused of election fraud by the Myanmar military.
Ms Suu Kyi’s charges have been widely attacked as politically motivated by independent election monitors who say the election was mostly free and fair.
Since the February 2021 coup, Myanmar’s military has brutally cracked down on pro-democracy protesters, killing more than 800 people and detaining more than 4,000, according to the monitoring group Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (AAPP).
Among the six charges against Ms Suu Kyi, 75, are illegally importing handheld radios, as well as violating the Corona virus rules. Before the hearing was adjourned on Monday, she was allowed 30 minutes with her attorneys.
Her health was described as good during the meeting in the capital Nay Pyi Taw, but she was not allowed access to the news media during her house arrest and knew little about what was going on in the country.
Lawyers for Suu Kyi said she wished people good health. Her National League for Democracy (NLD) party was also threatened by the military.
According to Khin Maung Zaw, one of her lawyers, the party grew out of the people so it will exist as long as people support it.

Myanmar in profile
Burma, also known as Myanmar, gained its independence from Britain in 1948. Throughout much of its modern history, it has been ruled by the military
In 2010, restrictions began loosening, leading to free elections in 2015 and the installation of Aung San Suu Kyi’s government in 2016.
As a response to Rohingya militant attacks on police, the Myanmar army executed a deadly crackdown, forcing more than half a million Rohingya Muslims across the border into Bangladesh, which the United Nations subsequently described as a textbook example of ethnic cleansing.

Happy Anniversary! It has been 7 years Since The Last Thai Military Coup

May 24, 2021

May 22nd, 2021 marked the 7th anniversary of the coup in which Gen. Prayut Chan-o-cha, then chief of the Thai Army, took control of Thailand. Differing opinions persist as regards progress for Thailand in the last 7 years and also the failings of the Thai ‘government’ since the coup.
Many believe the PM has worn out his welcome after beginning to lose the confidence of conservative groups that had previously supported him. They cite Covid-19 policy, which was once a shining example for the world but has failed in recent months to prevent Thailand’s third wave of outbreaks. A successful vaccination campaign over the next two months may warm up those cooling attitudes.
Many who hoped that the coup would bring transparency to the Thai government are disappointed as the regime tightens its hold on power rather than presenting an outward appearance of a modern government. In recent years, young people have mounted powerful opposition to the previously unshakable power of the government and the Royal Family. Currently, the discussion about the Thai monarchy is restricted by draconian laws that quash dissent and quiet dissenting voices.
Many questions whether Thailand has been able to reform since the coup, saying that tangible results are few and far between and democratic liberties have been curtailed. Last year, the Thai public came out in protest to protest long-term social injustice, evidence of a country racked by political conflict. The majority assumes that the public is not considered or involved in electing the people in politics who enact flawed amendments to the constitution whose main objective is to hold onto power rather than to progress the nation.
COPID-19 has brought up some of the government’s weaknesses, not only in dealing with the current third wave outbreak but also in dealing with corruption, illegal gambling, illegal immigration, human trafficking, and a lot of alleged “greased palms” in Bangkok’s entertainment venues that ignored Covid-19 restrictions leading to the current outbreak.
The Prime Minister Operation Centre released a list of 15 areas where reform has taken place since the coup in Thailand, including road, rail, transportation, and digital infrastructure. As a result, they assert that quality of life has improved due to assistance for low-income earners and welfare recipients, pension reform, and improvements in universal healthcare as well as reforms in education.
The PM’s office also claims success in agriculture, water resource management, and handling the Covid-19 pandemic. Bangkok has enacted new laws governing landowners, as well as addressing flooding, pollution, traffic, and traffic congestion.
Opponents of PM Prayut’s ruling party say the coup did not achieve its objectives. In Thailand, political unrest, social unrest, and political conflict have grown and become more polarized, despite attempts at reform by holding hearings and passing laws. In the areas of economic improvement, civil service reform, and education reform, no significant progress has been made. The opposition claims that the government that arose after the coup created more problems than it solved. In response to the assessment, a government spokesperson claimed that the present government had been working toward solutions to political conflicts and avoided getting involved in squabbles.
In response to the assessment, a government spokesperson claimed that the present government had been working toward solutions to political conflicts and avoided getting involved in squabbles. With the enactment of new bills soon, they say there will be substantial progress on revising the laws and opening the way for reform. According to the spokesman, parliamentary procedures have slowed progress on reforms and constitutional amendments.

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Happy Anniversary! It has been 7 years Since The Last Thai Military Coup

May 24, 2021

May 22nd, 2021 marked the 7th anniversary of the coup in which Gen. Prayut Chan-o-cha, then chief of the Thai Army, took control of Thailand. Differing opinions persist as regards progress for Thailand in the last 7 years and also the failings of the Thai ‘government’ since the coup.
Many believe the PM has worn out his welcome after beginning to lose the confidence of conservative groups that had previously supported him. They cite Covid-19 policy, which was once a shining example for the world but has failed in recent months to prevent Thailand’s third wave of outbreaks. A successful vaccination campaign over the next two months may warm up those cooling attitudes.
Many who hoped that the coup would bring transparency to the Thai government are disappointed as the regime tightens its hold on power rather than presenting an outward appearance of a modern government. In recent years, young people have mounted powerful opposition to the previously unshakable power of the government and the Royal Family. Currently, the discussion about the Thai monarchy is restricted by draconian laws that quash dissent and quiet dissenting voices.
Many questions whether Thailand has been able to reform since the coup, saying that tangible results are few and far between and democratic liberties have been curtailed. Last year, the Thai public came out in protest to protest long-term social injustice, evidence of a country racked by political conflict. The majority assumes that the public is not considered or involved in electing the people in politics who enact flawed amendments to the constitution whose main objective is to hold onto power rather than to progress the nation.
COPID-19 has brought up some of the government’s weaknesses, not only in dealing with the current third wave outbreak but also in dealing with corruption, illegal gambling, illegal immigration, human trafficking, and a lot of alleged “greased palms” in Bangkok’s entertainment venues that ignored Covid-19 restrictions leading to the current outbreak.
The Prime Minister Operation Centre released a list of 15 areas where reform has taken place since the coup in Thailand, including road, rail, transportation, and digital infrastructure. As a result, they assert that quality of life has improved due to assistance for low-income earners and welfare recipients, pension reform, and improvements in universal healthcare as well as reforms in education.
The PM’s office also claims success in agriculture, water resource management, and handling the Covid-19 pandemic. Bangkok has enacted new laws governing landowners, as well as addressing flooding, pollution, traffic, and traffic congestion.
Opponents of PM Prayut’s ruling party say the coup did not achieve its objectives. In Thailand, political unrest, social unrest, and political conflict have grown and become more polarized, despite attempts at reform by holding hearings and passing laws. In the areas of economic improvement, civil service reform, and education reform, no significant progress has been made. The opposition claims that the government that arose after the coup created more problems than it solved. In response to the assessment, a government spokesperson claimed that the present government had been working toward solutions to political conflicts and avoided getting involved in squabbles.
In response to the assessment, a government spokesperson claimed that the present government had been working toward solutions to political conflicts and avoided getting involved in squabbles. With the enactment of new bills soon, they say there will be substantial progress on revising the laws and opening the way for reform. According to the spokesman, parliamentary procedures have slowed progress on reforms and constitutional amendments.

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