Archive for the ‘September’ Category

Thai Crime: Thai People Connected With Red Bull Fugitive Have Been Charged

October 1, 2021

A former national police chief and a lawyer for the fugitive Red Bull heir, Vorayuth “Boss” Yoovidhya, are being investigated over the 2012 fatal hit-and-run case and are accused of ordering an officer to change the reported speed the billionaire was driving when sped his Ferrari through Bangkok’s Thong Lor district, running over a police officer and killing him. Reports say they allegedly told an investigation officer to change the speed from 177 kilometers per hour to just 76 kilometers per hour.
Changing the speed is said to have led prosecutors to drop the charge of reckless driving causing death. The billionaire managed to evade justice and fled the country in 2017, ditching his private jet in Singapore.
Nation Thailand reports that a Royal Thai Police special committee will investigate the ex-police chief, Somyot Pumphanmuang, and the lawyer, Thanit Buakhiew, to determine whether they changed the report on the actual speed Boss was driving when he hit the police officer.
The Police Internal Affairs chief who chairs the committee said yesterday that the investigation officer in the hit-and-run case presented an audio clip to the committee where the then-police chief and Boss’s attorney told him to change the speed from 177 kilometers per hour to just 76.
The committee’s chairperson says the audio recording will be reviewed and officers will investigate to determine if anyone else was involved. He says the committee is expected to reach a conclusion by the November 10 deadline.
“The reported reduction in car speed was the reason why the public prosecutor decided to drop the charge of reckless driving against Vorayuth… The committee will now carefully analyze the clip, interview Pol General Somyot and Thanit, and conduct further investigations to find if there were any other individuals involved in altering the true speed of Vorayuth’s car.”

Opposition Leaders Are Charged In Myanmar

October 1, 2021

Myanmar’s deposed President U Win Myint and State Counselor Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, and Naypyitaw Council chairman Dr. Myo Aung earlier this week pleaded not guilty to charges of incitement brought by the military regime that removed Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy (NLD) government in February.
The regime led by coup leader Senior General Min Aung Hlaing has filed 11 charges against Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and two charges each against U Win Myint and Dr. Myo Aung. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi was oppressed by successive military regimes for decades. Legal persecution is not new to U Win Myint and Dr. Myo Aung, either.
Anyhow, the detention of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi in an unknown location and the attempt to imprison her on baseless charges indicate that Snr-Gen Min Aung Hlaing is more ruthless than his predecessor, Senior General Than Shwe.
The State Law and Order Restoration Council (SLORC) and its successor, the State Peace and Development Council (SPDC), placed Daw Aung San Suu Kyi under house arrest three times between 1989 and 2010. U Win Myint and Dr. Myo Aung were also political prisoners under previous regimes.
In July 1989, as Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s popularity grew with the pro-democracy movement, she was placed under house arrest for the first time under Section 10 (b) of the 1975 State Protection Act. The provision carries a three-year prison sentence, and she was due to be released in July 1992. The regime changed the law in 1991 and increased the prison term to five years.
The amendment meant Daw Aung San Suu Kyi would remain under arrest for two more years. In July 1994, she was due to be released, but the regime refused by saying that she had been detained under a decree from July 1989 to July 1990, so that period would not be included in her five-year house arrest. As a result of the regime’s clever interpretation, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi spent six years under house arrest in total, and was released only in 1995.
In September 2000, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi was forcibly stopped at Yangon General Railway Station as she was attempting to leave for Mandalay to campaign for her party. She was taken back to her home in Yangon’s Bahan Township where she spent one year and eight months in confinement until May 2002, without having committed any offense.
Just before her second house arrest, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and her entourage, while traveling to Kunchangon and Kawhmu townships, were beaten and placed under house arrest for two weeks. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi was snatched and taken home by six policewomen from Dala on the opposite bank of Yangon. Among those who were placed under 14 days of house arrest was Dr. Myo Aung, who later served as Naypyitaw Council chairman in the NLD government that was ousted this year.
The public support for Daw Aung San Suu Kyi did not wane, despite the regime’s hope that she would fade into obscurity after years of separation from the public. This led to the attempted assassination of the NLD leader while she was on a campaign trip in Tabayin in May 2003. She escaped the attack and was sent to Insein Prison, then again locked up at her house.
She began her third house arrest in May 2003. According to the law, the maximum sentence is five years in prison, however, the regime counted the prison term as starting in May 2004. In early May 2009, two weeks before her scheduled release from house arrest, US citizen John Yettaw trespassed on her lakeside residence.
Daw Aung San Suu Kyi (far left), U Win Myint (middle), and Dr. Myo Aung (right) appear in court in Naypyitaw in May.
Daw Aung San Suu Kyi was prosecuted under Section 22 of the State Protection Act for this illegal visit. They believed the regime used it as an excuse to confine her until the general election was over in 2010.
Daw Aung San Suu Kyi was detained in the officers’ quarters of the Correctional Department inside Insein Prison and put on trial for the first time. In August 2009, she was sentenced to three years in prison with labor.
Consequently, Home Affairs Minister Major General Maung Aung read Snr-Gen Than Shwe’s instruction before the judges, diplomats, and journalists that she would only have to serve half of the jail term no matter how many years she was handed by the court. The remainder of the sentence would be suspended and she would be freed from having to serve it if she behaved well. She was placed under house arrest. As scripted and directed by the regime, she was released from house arrest on Nov. 13, 2010, five days after the regime-held a general election.
She entered the parliament, which was dominated by the ex-generals, two years later. Her NLD won a majority in the general election in 2015 and formed the government for the first time, 25 years after winning the 1990 general election, only for the regime to refuse to hand overpower. It was the first civilian government in more than five decades since the 1962 coup by Gen. Ne Win.
In the 2020 poll, the NLD again secured an electoral mandate to manage the country for five more years. However, the Myanmar military, which has never enjoyed public support and has never been able to remove Daw Aung San Suu Kyi from Myanmar’s political leadership role, seized power in a coup in February this year. She was arrested for the fourth time at the age of 76 and is being held in an unknown location in Naypyitaw
Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is facing 11 charges—including absurd accusations like illegal possession of walkie-talkies and misuse of land for a foundation named after her late mother—a larger number than was brought by former military dictators Senior General Saw Maung and Snr-Gen Than Shwe.

New NBA 2K League Launches In Mexico

October 1, 2021

According to the NBA 2K League, DUX Gaming has agreed to launch an NBA 2K League franchise in Mexico. SBJ has learned that the purchase price for DUX Gaming’s NBA 2K League franchise slot was around $25M.
In the 2022 season, the team will officially begin competing from a city in Mexico to be announced at a later date. On Nov. 17, DUX Gaming will also take part in the third NBA 2K League Expansion Draft.
Rafael “RafaelTGR” Tobias Garcera Rodrigo, a former NBA 2K League Draft prospect and participant at the NBA 2K League European Invitational in 2019, will serve as DUX Gaming’s new General Manager.
Gen.G Tigers is the only other team operating outside the U.S. Team name, the host city, and logo will be announced at a later date.
A two-time Liga champion and an amateur player on the NBA 2K European circuit, DUX Gaming participates in a number of international esports tournaments and Spanish football leagues. In 2020, DUX Gaming became the first esports organization to own a semi-professional football club, DUX Internacional de Madrid. This year, it founded DUX Logrono, which competes in the second division of Spanish women’s football.

Thai Government Signs Deal With AstraZeneca To Get Millions Of COVID Vaccine

October 1, 2021

According to a new deal signed with AstraZeneca, Thailand will purchase 60 million vaccines next year to use as a booster shot for the third vaccine. The Ministry of Public Health has signed a contract with Covid-19 vaccine manufacturer to acquire the booster shots over the course of 3 quarters in 2022.
The signing was accompanied by a ceremony attended by Minister of Public Health Anutin Charnvirakul and Department of Disease Director-General Control Dr Opas Karnkawinpong, as well as representatives from AstraZeneca Thailand.
The first-quarter delivery of 15 million vaccines is planned, followed by a second delivery of 30 million vaccines in the second quarter. The remaining 15 million vaccines are expected to be delivered in the third quarter of 2022.
Under the contract with AstraZeneca, Thailand will pay AstraZeneca 18 billion baht for 60 million vaccines. A vaccine costs 300 baht.
The contract with AstraZeneca allows Thailand to switch to any newer version of the Covid-19 vaccine that is developed by the producers between now and the estimated delivery date. A second-generation vaccine is already being developed.
AstraZeneca vaccines produced locally by Siam Bioscience, a subsidiary of Crown Property Bureau, were not mentioned in the MCOT report. The local production was supposed to produce 10 million vaccines a month for use in Thailand while exporting more to Southeast Asia, a plan that has been controversial and controversial.
Thailand has recently received AstraZeneca vaccines through donations from Japan and Singapore.

Thai Crime: Thai DSI Is Re-Investigating Case That Happened In 2014

September 30, 2021

The Department of Special Investigation (DSI) is moving quickly to respond to a request by prosecutors to provide more information on the 2014 killing of Karen activist Porlajee “Billy” Rakchongcharoen.
DSI director-general, Pol Lt Col Korrawat Panprapakorn said he has instructed investigators to work quickly to find additional information.
On Sept 9, the Office of the Attorney-General (OAG) asked the DSI to furnish additional information in key areas in the Porlajee case which prosecutors still have queries about.
They include the test to ascertain the bloodline connection between Porlajee and his mother, the use of special instruments in examining the bone fragments believed to be those of the activist, and the forensic results on the bones.
Two yIn the meantime, prosecutors dropped the most serious charges including murder against Chaiwat and the three others.
The DSI had recommended that prosecutors press up to eight charges against the officials and also filed its disagreement with their decision not to indict them for murder.ears ago, skull fragments, which the DSI determined to be Porlajee’s, were retrieved from Kaeng Krachan reservoir in Phetchaburi.
An OAG panel has said there was not enough evidence to determine if the bone fragments indeed belonged to Porlajee.
As a consequence, there was insufficient proof to link four suspects — Chaiwat Limlikit-aksorn, a former head of Kaeng Krachan National Park, and Bunthaen Butsarakham, Thanaset Chaemthet, and Kritsanaphong Chitthet — to Porlajee’s disappearance and murder, according to the prosecutors.
The evidence included a DNA test on the skull fragments believed to be Porlajee’s, which the DSI insisted was a match to his mother’s DNA. However, the prosecutors felt more information and evidence were needed to back the DSI’s investigation.

Coup Era Has Not Been Easy For Myanmar Women

September 30, 2021

Khine Thu fled her home in Myanmar’s northwestern Sagaing region for the first time, fleeing into the jungle as soldiers stormed her village. Though she has lost count of how many times she has fled since she thinks it might be about 15.
“We run whenever we hear soldiers coming,” she said. “We escape into the forest and return to the village when the soldiers are gone.”
109 people have been killed in the region since July, according to a report Myanmar’s National Unity Government (NUG) submitted to the UN Human Rights Council on September 19.
Human rights groups and local media documented mass killings in July in Depayin and Kani townships, where 73 people died. As security forces maintain a presence in the area’s villages, women are living with the effects of conflict on a daily basis. The military blocked internet access in 10 townships in the Sagaing region this month, including Kani, raising fears that the military may intensify its attacks.
The violence began in Khine Thu’s village of Satpyarkyin in Depayin township on June 14, when soldiers opened fire and killed one person after the bodies of two daughters of a military administrator were found in a nearby village.
As a result of the soldiers’ return on July 2, at least 32 local people were killed by indiscriminate shelling and small arms fire, according to the NUG report. Meanwhile, Myanmar Now reported that 10,000 people from eleven villages fled their homes following the clashes.
The People’s Defence Force (PDF) in Depayin said on its Facebook page that 26 of its members were killed in the incident and that the military had fired heavy weapons onto fleeing villagers, while the state-run Global New Light of Myanmar reported that “armed terrorists” had “ambushed” security forces, killing one soldier and injuring six before retreating after security forces retaliated
As well as the other women Al Jazeera spoke to, Khine Thu requested anonymity for fear of reprisals. She said soldiers have been in and out since then, and that she and other villagers were always ready to flee. When the soldiers leave, the village remains.
Shops and markets are closed.
When hiding in the forest for days or weeks at a time, she said, the villagers have difficulty meeting their basic needs.
“We couldn’t get water sometimes,” she said. On some days, we ate only one meal, or rice with salt and oil or fish paste. I’m depressed, and sometimes I don’t even want to live anymore.”
Aye Chan, a local resident, said people do not have access to medicine and rely on plants and herbs to treat their ailments.
Khine Thu and she have stopped working as hired farmhands due to the danger.
“We can’t live in peace.”. We can’t work. “We are dependent on other people’s donations and run around for safety whenever [soldiers] arrive,” said Aye Chan. The presence of soldiers in our village affects us mentally and physically. We are unable to eat or sleep.
In the weeks following its seizure of power from the elected government led by Aung San Suu Kyi, the military has used force and widespread arrests to crush mass protests and a civil disobedience movement.
Over 1,100 people have been killed and more than 8,200 arrested since then, according to a rights group tracking the military’s abuses, Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (Burma) or AAPP.
In an effort to resist military rule peacefully, many people have taken up arms. Some have joined existing ethnic armed organisations, while others have joined local resistance groups founded across the country in recent months, including in areas like Depayin and Kani, where the majority-Bamar residents reside.
It also announced in May the formation of a national-level People’s Defence Force (PDF), whose size and activities remain largely unknown. On September 7, it proclaimed a “people’s defensive war,” calling on citizens to “revolt” against the military.
Many local armed resistance groups, which also call themselves PDFs but are not affiliated with the NUG, face a military that has accumulated at least $2.4 billion in weapons over the past decade, armed with little more than single-shot hunting rifles and with little training or combat experience.
Asymmetrical tactics, including ambushes on military convoys and police stations, have been used to claim hundreds of military soldiers dead. In response, the military has indiscriminately attacked their communities, just as it has in areas with ethnic armed groups since the 1960s.
In the past, the military has labeled ethnic armed groups as “insurgents” or “terrorists” and targeted ethnic areas under the guise of national security. It now follows a similar narrative.
According to a statement released by the military on August 28, PDFs, the NUG, and the committee that appointed them are considered terrorist organizations. Anyone who encourages people to participate in terrorist acts, shelters members of these groups, or provides financial support to them would also be considered terrorists.
Earlier this year, a United Nations-appointed fact-finding mission described how the military uses rape to terrorize and punish ethnic minorities, saying such acts are “part of a deliberate, well-planned strategy to intimidate, terrorize and punish civilians.”
In May, a 15-year-old girl in Sagaing region was raped and killed by soldiers, according to an ethnic Chin rights group, and in July, Radio Free Asia reported that a woman in Kachin State was found raped and stabbed to death near a military outpost on the way to her farm and that the military was investigating the case.
Thandar Aye, a women’s rights activist who works in the Sagaing region and neighboring Chin State, told Al Jazeera that soldiers commonly harass women verbally, and she worries that additional cases of physical or sexual assault may go unreported due to social stigma and fear of retaliation from the military.
Women in the region, she added, avoid leaving their homes even during the day due to concern that soldiers could sexually assault them. “Women cannot go out freely,” she said. “Most women are just staying inside their houses and facing food shortages.”
Phyoe, a grocery store owner from Chyaung Ma village, told Al Jazeera that she goes out as little as possible for this reason.
“I heard that women were raped in some other villages and regions, so I am really afraid that it could happen to me,” she said.
She is among at least 15,000 civilians displaced by intense clashes since April in Kani Township, located 100km (62 miles) southwest of Depayin.
“When [soldiers] come, we close everything and run again. Only elderly and women with small children who cannot run are left in the village,” said Phyoe, who, like Khine Thu, can no longer remember the number of times she and her family have fled.
In July, 43 bodies were found in four locations of Kani township, according to the NUG report; the AAPP and media documented signs of torture on most of the bodies. The military has not released any public statements or responded to media inquiries in response to the deaths.
“[Soldiers] accused normal locals of participating in the PDF, and they killed many people who were taking refuge in the forest,” said Phyoe. “We aren’t safe at home, and we aren’t safe in the forest either … We have been sleepless since soldiers came to our village.”
Soldiers have twice occupied Phyoe’s house; they have also stolen valuables from her home and emptied the shelves of her family’s grocery store.
She said Chyaung Ma’s streets are deserted after dark, and when soldiers come through, locals who remain in the village are too afraid to move around inside their homes for fear they could be shot.
Unable to earn an income or buy goods, her family is now relying on food donations from relatives and other villagers.
“[Soldiers’] presence in our village and all the cruel things [they did] really affected our lives and survival,” she said.
Thuzar also runs a small shop and lives in Na Myar village, which lies 30km (18 miles) east of Satpyarkyin in Depayin township. She too has been in and out of the forest since soldiers fired artillery and raided her village on August 9.
“Everyone in the village prepared a few things in case the soldiers came, but when they actually came, we escaped in a hurry, so we couldn’t bring much with us,” she said.
With only trees and some small tarpaulins to provide shelter from the rain, they watched as artillery struck a nearby herd of goats.
“The images of dead goats were so grotesque,” said Thuzar. “We are depressed and hurt mentally because we have seen many things that we shouldn’t see.”
When the soldiers left on August 9, villagers returned home to find their property vandalized and looted. “[Soldiers] took all the food from our refrigerator and ransacked our wardrobe,” she said. “We had locked the door of one room, and they destroyed the door…They took everything. They didn’t even leave the 2,000 Myanmar kyat ($1.20) in my daughter’s school bag.”
Among other things, soldiers trashed her friend’s refrigerator by filling it with sand, and in some houses where elderly people were left behind, “one soldier talked to them at the front door while other soldiers went into the house from the back and took whatever they wanted.”
Later in August, soldiers occupied the village for about 10 days. Thuzar returned home to find her chickens gone and more than 30 houses raided. At a grocery store at the entrance to the village, locals discovered piles of gunny sacks doused in paraffin oil. “If [soldiers] had lit them, our whole village would have turned to ashes,” she said.
Thuzar and her husband closed their shop after the coup and began farming rice instead.
Now she worries that they won’t have time to finish planting before the end of the rainy season in October.
When things calm down, we go back for a few days and everyone rushes to plant,” she said.

Donkey Kong Is Now Part of Super Nintendo World In Japan

September 30, 2021

Super Nintendo World in Japan is expanding to include a Donkey Kong themed area, and I am ready to plan my trip to Donk City.
If you’ve been daydreaming about your next holiday when travel restrictions ease, let me suggest Super Nintendo World. You can find it set inside Universal Studios Japan in Osaka.
Perhaps you want to race on a Mario Karts-inspired course? Or maybe you want to hunt for eggs with Yoshi? You can also punch real blocks and even eat one filled with tiramisu in a restaurant modeled after Toad’s house.
If that isn’t enough for you, though, everyone’s favorite executive ape (Donkey Kong is always wearing a business dress, after all) is getting his own area in the park in 2024.
According to reporting in Video Games Chronicle, the expansion will increase the size of the Super Nintendo world by 70%.
In a press release, Nintendo announced that the new area will include a roller coaster, interactive experiences, and themed food and merch.
Shigeru Miyamoto, the illustrious video game designer (and as he calls himself, ‘Mario’s dad’!), added:
“I am very happy to be able to make the world of Donkey Kong a reality following the world of Mario. I am looking forward to creating a thrilling Donkey Kong experience with the amazing team at Universal. It will take some time until it is completed, but it will be a unique area for not only people who are familiar with Donkey Kong games but for all guests.”
Super Nintendo World opened up in March of this year in Japan. There are versions being built in the Universal Studios theme parks in California and Florida. If you are excited to go ape (I’m so sorry), then you can start planning your trip to Donkey Kong’s area in Osaka in 2024.

Are you hyped to visit Donkey Kong at Super Nintendo World? Are you a fan of any other cool theme parks around the world? Let us know via our social media channel

The Great Flood of 2011 Should Not Repeat In 2021

September 30, 2021

Thailand will not face a repeat of the 2011 floods that devastated the country, according to experts and government officials.
Public concern about the flood situation, which has wreaked havoc in several parts of the country, is being addressed.
Several water retention areas have been created, and a systematic water management system is in place to deal with the situation and store floodwater during the dry season.
“I have instructed provincial governors and the Interior Ministry to be ready to help flood victims,” he said.
In his remarks, he stressed the importance of timely flood alerts and preparing food, drinking water, and relief supplies for the quick delivery to flood victims.
The executive director of the Geo-Informatics and Space Technology Development Agency (Gistda), Pakorn Ataphant, said several factors will prevent a repeat of the 2011 flooding.
As compared to 2011, Thailand was battered by several storms, rather than the current situation in which only a few storms have arrived.
According to him, aerial photographs from 2011 showed about 25 million rai of land was flooded, but aerial photographs taken in 2021 showed about 2.5 million rai underwater.
After the 2011 flood, water management plans have improved significantly, with the construction of flood levees and the addition of 160,000 rai of water retention areas, Pakorn said.
Flooding will not be severe except in coastal communities, where shallow floodwaters may reach 30 cm, but this will drain away within a few days. In 2011, economic and industrial areas were not affected,” Pakorn said.
The Natural Disaster Warning Council released an assessment of the current flood situation compared to the 2011 floods earlier this week.
Pramote Maiklad, the vice-chairman of the foundation and former director-general of the Royal Irrigation Department (RID), said the water level in the country’s four major dams is low compared with 2011. Therefore, a repeat of 2011 is unlikely.
Similarly, Sutat Weesakul, director of the Hydro-Informatics Institute, said two major dams — Bhumibol Dam and Sirikit Dam — are currently half full.
The dams still have enough capacity to take in more water in the case of two more storms, he said, adding the level of the Chao Phraya River is still low thanks to the construction of high embankments along the river.
As Sakchai Boonma, the deputy governor of Bangkok, explained, much of the water run-off from the North will not reach Bangkok, as the RID will divert it to Chachoengsao, Prachin Buri, and Ayutthaya.
“People in Bangkok and the surrounding provinces shouldn’t worry,” he said.
Meanwhile, Pasak Jolasid Dam officials in Lop Buri on Wednesday sent a warning letter to the five downstream provinces of Lop Buri, Saraburi, Ayutthaya, Pathum Thani, and Nonthaburi, saying the dam was holding 953 million cubic meters on Wednesday morning, or 99.27% of its capacity. The dam would need to speed up water discharges.
Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha and cabinet ministers handed out relief supplies to flood victims in Chaiyaphum’s Muang district.
The premier also inspected flood management operations in the northeastern province.
He also expressed concern for tens of millions of farmers whose farmland has been damaged by flooding, adding that the government will come up with measures to fix the economy, eradicate poverty, and boost incomes.

Thai Crime: Thai PM Does Not Like The Amount Of Police Officers Are Getting Misconduct

September 29, 2021

Police officers found guilty of misconduct will face immediate and severe punishment, according to PM Prayut Chan-o-cha. 176 Royal Thai Police officers have been found guilty of misconduct since January.
Recently, the prime minister met with the Royal Thai Police Bureau to discuss the most recent cases of police misconduct. Since last January, 131 police officers have been disciplined, 38 have been removed from service, and 7 have been fired. 28 officers have been disciplined, 23 have been fired, and 5 have been removed from service this month.
Former police superintendent Joe Ferrari and six of his subordinates are accused of suffocating a suspect to death in an attempt to extort 2 million baht from him. The seven officers are being held in Bangkok’s Klong Prem Central Prison.
Maj-Gen. Yingyot Thepjamnong, spokesperson for the RTP, says the disciplinary action against officers shows the commission is taking misconduct seriously. Yingyot adds that officers who commit misconduct in criminal cases will be punished through the judicial process.

Opposition Groups Have Bombed A Police Station In The Myanmar Capital

September 29, 2021

It is the latest in a series of similar attacks in the former capital in recent months that two anti-junta guerrilla groups have bombed a police station in downtown Yangon.
The Yangon Anti-Dictatorship Force said it bombed the fourth floor of the Kyauktada Township police station on Sule Pagoda road early in the morning.
A guerrilla group called 44st-UG teamed up with the group in honor of activists who died in an August military raid on Yangon’s 44th street.
The statement stated, “We were able to retreat safely after the incident.”.
The woman who lives near the police station said she didn’t know if anyone was hurt in the blast. It had just stopped raining when I heard a loud bang at 7:30 am. I thought it was a thunderclap at first. “My heart was racing,” she said.
She cited other locals who said Junta forces tightened security in the area and started inspecting pedestrians. Police interrogated three young men, she added.
Since June, as a result of the junta’s murderous crackdown on peaceful protesters, attacks against junta targets have increased.
On Monday, several blasts and shootings were reported in the Yangon townships of Kamayut, Hlaing, and North Okkalapa, reportedly resulting in several deaths and injuries.