Archive for the ‘Aung San Suu Kyi’ Category

Opposition Leader Has Been Put On Trial In Myanmar

September 27, 2021

Myanmar’s military government has put deposed leader Aung San Suu Kyi on trial for incitement, her lawyer said, adding to a long list of charges that could land her in prison for decades.
Aung San Suu Kyi and her National League for Democracy (NLD) were ousted by the military in a February coup that sparked a mass uprising and a brutal crackdown on dissent.
Since then, the Nobel laureate, 76, has been living under house arrest with only periodic meetings with her lawyers and court appearances.
Khin Maung Zaw, her lawyer, said she pleaded not guilty to charges of incitement noting that she appeared in good health despite missing a separate hearing a week earlier due to illness.
For each charge, the maximum sentence is three years in prison.
Deposed president Win Myint has also pleaded not guilty to incitement.
According to prosecution testimony, Aung San Suu Kyi flouted the Coronavirus ban during the landslide elections last year that her party won.
She will face corruption charges next month, and she is also charged with violating a colonial-era secrecy law, although her trial has not yet taken place.
During the 2020 elections, when it trounced a party aligned with the generals, the military deposed her government over unsubstantiated allegations of voter fraud.
According to a local monitoring group, security forces have killed more than 1,100 civilians since the coup.
According to the military, the death toll is much lower.

Opposition Leader Aung San Suu Kyi Will Have Trial On October 1st

September 21, 2021

A trial of Myanmar’s deposed civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi on corruption charges is set to begin on October 1, a member of her legal team has said.
Lawyer Khin Maung Zaw said on Friday a judge declared the trial would be held at the Special Court in the capital, Naypyidaw, on every other Friday.
He announced the decision after presentations in the court by Aung San Suu Kyi’s lawyers and prosecutors from the central city of Mandalay, where the charges were originally lodged.
Aung San Suu Kyi has been under house arrest since her National League for Democracy (NLD) government was deposed by the military in a February coup that sparked a mass uprising and a brutal crackdown on dissent. She is currently being tried on other charges by the Special Court.
In the continuing trial, she faces charges of sedition, two counts of flouting COVID-19 pandemic restrictions, illegally importing walkie-talkies that were for her bodyguards’ use and the unlicensed use of the radios.
She also is due to be tried for breaching the official secrets law in a case that was transferred earlier this week to Naypyidaw from Yangon, Myanmar’s biggest city.
Her lawyers deny any wrongdoing.
Aung San Suu Kyi’s supporters, as well as independent analysts, say all the charges against her are politically motivated and an attempt to discredit her and legitimize the military’s seizure of power while keeping her from returning to politics.
A nationwide anti-coup uprising and continuing unrest have paralyzed the country.
More than 1,100 people have been killed and some 8,000 arrested, according to a local monitoring group. The military says the toll is much lower.
Military ruler Senior General Min Aung Hlaing said last month that elections would be held and a state of emergency lifted by August 2023, extending an initial one-year timeline announced days after the February 1 coup.

The Myanmar Military Captain Who Tried To Kill Aung San Suu Kyi’s Father, Has Died Of COVID-19

July 27, 2021

The former military captain who shot pro-democracy leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi 32 years ago died of COVID-19 after he was initially turned down for treatment by a military hospital.
An ex-captain died at a medical facility run by the military on Saturday in Yangon’s Hmawbi district.
The National League for Democracy (NLD) candidate was on the campaign trail in Ayeyarwady Region on April 4, 1989, when she and her supporters were confronted by a group of soldiers led by a captain in the delta town of Danubyu. Because of the huge popular support for Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and her NLD at the time, the then military regime tried to suppress them.
Myint Oo ordered the procession to disperse that day. Despite the soldiers’ warnings, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and her supporters continued to walk on the side of the road, prompting them to point their rifles at the group.
The intense situation was defused by a major who interrupted the captain and told him not to shoot, telling him, “This isn’t the front line… This is politics.”
Myint Oo was furious at the major’s intervention. On the spot, he tore off his epaulets.
Several years later, the captain recalled that he would have fired on Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and her supporters if he had received a written order from higher up.
I just wanted to follow orders as a responsible soldier,” he said, adding that the last-minute change in the order made him angry enough to tear off his epaulets, because “they didn’t follow the order they issued.”
Myint Oo remained in the army despite tearing off his epaulets until 1992 when he was transferred to the Irrigation Ministry, where he eventually retired as a deputy director.
He remained anti-NLD and anti-Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, using his Facebook account to express his displeasure and loyalty to the military after the NLD came to power in 2015.
On July 18, however, he was rushed to the 1,000-Bed Military Hospital in Yangon after developing a fever, one of the symptoms of COVID-19. Officers on duty yelled at him and did not welcome him. He tested positive two days after seeking admission and was sent to a COVID-19 center without proper referral documents. He has also turned away from that center.
This angered him so much that he wrote on his Facebook page that he “didn’t want to turn red after having been green for so long,” meaning that he was pondering whether to support the NLD after being betrayed by the military.
While Myint Oo was glad that he was finally taken care of by the military he held dear, the first rejections and mistreatment of him there made him contemplate the true nature of the military he had been loyal to all of his life.

UN Urged The Myanmar Military To Release Aung San Suu Kyi

July 3, 2021

UN spokesperson said Antonio Guterres urged Myanmar’s military to release Nobel Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi and President Win Myint immediately after thousands of other detainees were freed five months after the coup.
Aung San Suu Kyi’s elected government was overthrown by the army on February 1 when it took control of the country.
“We reiterate our call for the immediate release of all those arbitrarily detained, including Win Myint and Aung San Suu Kyi,” Eri Kaneko, Guterres’ associate spokesperson, said on Thursday.
The military said more than 2,000 people were detained on incitement charges for participating in protests, including journalists and others.
Many of the military’s opponents have been jailed and convicted under a law that criminalizes statements that could spread fear or misinformation. She remains in detention for an offense related to this among others.
The continued use of violence and intimidation by the security forces, including arbitrary arrests, remains deeply concerning, said Kaneko.
The burning of army uniforms
Hundreds of protesters took to the streets of Myanmar’s biggest city, Yangon, on Thursday to mark the fifth month since the coup. They set fire to an army uniform and chanted for democracy.
In many parts of Southeast Asia, protests against the army are held daily, but this was one of the largest protests in Myanmar in recent weeks.
What are our goals? I love democracy! I love democracy!While throwing colorful smoke flares through the street, protesters chanted.
In the name of the people! A video published by Reuters shows them shouting “For the people!”.
Reuters was unable to contact a military spokesman for comment.
Since the coup, Myanmar’s army has struggled to assert its authority. There have been protests, strikes that have paralyzed the public and private sectors, and a resurgence of border conflicts.

American Reporter Released From Myanmar Prison

June 16, 2021

Nathan Maung’s lawyer Tin Zar Oo announced recently that the police chief withdrew the charges against her client. He was initially accused of spreading misinformation.As for why the charges were dropped, Tin Zar Oo said, “the main reason is that the US Embassy was calling for the rights of their citizen and we prepared all the documents for him. I think Nathan Maung was released because both the embassy and the lawyers communicated with each other well.”Nathan Maung and Hanthar Nyein were charged with crimes under section 505a of Myanmar’s penal code — a law amended by the military making it illegal to publish or circulate comments that spread misinformation or incite government officials.Nathan Maung’s charges were dropped, but Hanthar Nyein remains in prison on charges of spreading misinformation. Tin Zar Oo said she believes he will face further charges, but this has yet to be confirmed.Nathan Maung was happy to be freed, but Hanthar Nyein remains behind bars, according to Tin Zar Oo.”I saw him with a sad face,” she said. “He told us he would do everything in his power to free Hanthar.”He was taking a Covid test on Monday, and his family who live in Myanmar allowed him to meet them, she said. He was to leave the country at 7:40 a.m. local time on a ticket arranged by the US Embassy, she said.State Department officials said they are following the case very closely, but did not have any new information to share at this time.Since the military took over on February 1, 2021, more than 860 people have been killed by junta-led security forces and at least 6,046 have been arrested for all sorts of crimes, including protesters, activists, journalists, celebrities, and government officials.The junta also suppressed information by suspending the licenses of independent media houses, raiding media offices, and issuing arrest warrants for journalists.As a result of the conflict, many media workers have fled abroad or fled to rebel-controlled jungles. To avoid arrest, those who remain in the cities have gone into hiding and switch safe houses every few days.Reporting ASEAN documented that 87 journalists have been arrested, with 51 still in detention.On the same day that Nathan Maung was released, the trial of ousted civil leader Aung San Suu Kyi began. As part of the first criminal proceedings against Suu Kyi, a court in the capital heard three charges, including that she violated a communications law by using walkie-talkie radios and had violated coronavirus restrictions during her election campaign last year.Additionally, the court heard a case against deposed president U Win Myint for alleged violations of disaster management laws.On two other counts, Suu Kyi’s trial will soon resume, while the most serious charges against her, namely corruption and violations of the State Secrets Act, have not yet been assigned a trial date.The court proceedings have been called a “show trial” and a “political spectacle intended to discredit Aung San Suu Kyi and the democratic opposition.”

Aung San Suu Kyi Charged With Bribery By Myanmar Military

June 13, 2021

Aung San Suu Kyi has been charged with corruption by Myanmar’s military authorities, the most serious charge against her to date.

Suu Kyi is accused of accepting cash and gold in bribes and faces up to 15 years in prison if convicted.

Six other charges are pending against her, including illegally importing walkie-talkies and inciting public unrest.

In a coup on 1 February 2021, the former state counsellor was arrested.

Since then, she has been held under house arrest and has barely been seen or heard from except for brief court appearances.

According to a press release issued by the military council, Suu Kyi accepted $600,000 (£425,000) in bribes and seven pieces of gold.

Additionally, it alleged that the previous civilian government – the National League for Democracy (NLD) – had lost substantial amounts of money in land deals. As well as Suu Kyi, who spent years under house arrest during previous periods of military rule, several other former officials face similar charges of corruption and bribery.

Previously, Suu Kyi had been charged with breaking the official secrets act, which carries a sentence of up to 14 years in prison.

After the general elections in 2020, Myanmar’s military seized power on allegations of voter fraud.

However, independent election monitors say the election was mostly free and fair, and the charges against Ms Suu Kyi are widely viewed as politically motivated.

Due to her enduring popularity, they will likely be used to disqualify her from running in future elections.

Khin Maung Zaw, her lawyer, said the corruption charges are absurd and that she could face long prison terms if found guilty.

“That’s one of the reasons to charge her,” he said.

Burma’s military has brutally suppressed pro-democracy protesters following the coup.

According to the monitoring group Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (AAPP), security forces have killed more than 800 people and detained nearly 5,000 people to date.

The charges against Aung San Suu Kyi:
Corruption, which carries a maximum jail term of 15 years;
Violation of the official secrets act, which carries a maximum jail term of 14 years
Illegally importing walkie-talkies, which carries a maximum jail term of three years
Importing walkie-talkies, which carries a maximum jail term of one year
Violation of a natural disaster law, which carries a maximum jail term of three years
Inciting public unrest, which carries a maximum jail term of three years

Myanmar Leader Suu Kyi Is Facing More Charges Before Trial On June 14th, 2021

June 12, 2021

Myanmar’s former leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, who led the country until the military took control in a coup in February, is facing more corruption charges just days before a formal trial is set to begin.
According to Global New Light Of Myanmar, the allegations, which come on top of a string of other charges, follow an investigation by the Anti-Corruption Commission into the Daw Khin Kyi Foundation.
According to the paper, she was found guilty of corruption by using her position. “So she was charged under section 55 of the Anti-Corruption Law.”
She is also accused of wrongdoing over a number of land and property leases for her foundation, where she is the chair, as well as accepting $600,000 and gold from the former chief minister of the Yangon region.
According to the paper, several other officials were also found guilty of corruption in granting land use permits.
According to the paper, the police stations in their respective townships opened case files against them recently.
Aung San Suu Kyi and senior members of her government were taken into custody by the military on February 1 after army chief Min Aung Hlaing seized power, plunging the country in a protracted crisis.
The generals’ power grab has sparked months of protests and a mass civil disobedience movement, which has been met with force. According to the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners, which has been monitoring the situation, more than 850 people have been killed in the crackdown.
In addition to carrying unlicensed walkie-talkies, she violated the country’s coronavirus restrictions and breached its colonial-era Official Secrets Act.
On June 14, 2021, Aung Sun Suu Kyi is set to go on trial. Myanmar’s former leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, who led the country until the military took control in a coup in February, is facing more corruption charges just days before a formal trial is set to begin.
According to Global New Light Of Myanmar, the allegations, which come on top of a string of other charges, follow an investigation by the Anti-Corruption Commission into the Daw Khin Kyi Foundation.
According to the paper, she was found guilty of corruption by using her position. “So she was charged under section 55 of the Anti-Corruption Law.”
She is also accused of wrongdoing over a number of land and property leases for her foundation, where she is the chair, as well as accepting $600,000 and gold from the former chief minister of the Yangon region.
According to the paper, several other officials were also found guilty of corruption in granting land use permits.
According to the paper, the police stations in their respective townships opened case files against them recently.
Aung San Suu Kyi and senior members of her government were taken into custody by the military on February 1 after army chief Min Aung Hlaing seized power, plunging the country into a protracted crisis.
The generals’ power grab has sparked months of protests and a mass civil disobedience movement, which has been met with force. According to the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners, which has been monitoring the situation, more than 850 people have been killed in the crackdown.
In addition to carrying unlicensed walkie-talkies, she violated the country’s coronavirus restrictions and breached its colonial-era Official Secrets Act.
On June 14, 2021, Aung Sun Suu Kyi is set to go on trial.